Charles Roe

Charles Roe was born in Harrison County. He left Kentucky to work for the F.B.I. in Washington, D.C. as a cryptanalyst. He then joined the Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory and for several years worked as a combat system engineer and project manager on U.S. Navy and NATO programs. He holds a B.S. from the University of Maryland and an M.S. from Johns Hopkins University. He is widowed with two adult children and now resides in Lexington. Roe is a writer of regional fiction – primarily stories of the Kentucky mountain region and the areas closer to the Bluegrass where he grew up. He is the author of eleven novels including Bourbon County and Big Sandy River, a memoir (Adrift), and a collection of short stories (My Native Home). In The Place Your Heart Calls Home, he revisits some of the places included in his earlier stories.

The Place Your Heart Calls Home

The Place Your Heart Calls Home

The Place Your Heart Calls Home is a sparkling collection of stories from the pen of Charles L. Roe. From his Lexington home, he paints vivid portraits of the rich, rugged landscape and strong, spirited inhabitants of Eastern Kentucky and the Bluegrass region. In these stories of his Kentucky – present and past – Roe moves between fiction and autobiographical accounts of the places he has known. The stories are tinctured with mountain lore and customs, family histories, and tall tales. They detail the struggle against fickle fate and stoic resignation to ill fortune or death. They are flavored with the pungent tobacco weed and clear liquid stomach-burning elixir of the mountain still and the sound of fiddle, banjo, and mouth harp. Meet his unforgettable characters – Burley Jackson, banjo impresario; Lynn Rowland, a nurse on horseback; Washington Blevins, caught up in a mountain feud; Trent Lowry, a pulp fiction writer in search of a story; and Joshua Creech, a young man out of his element in World War II. He captures the mannerisms and speech of these people he has long known. A proud, self-sufficient people steeped in tradition, family values, and religious conviction living harsh lives in a beautiful country walled in by the high mountains of Appalachia.