Susan Owens

Susan Owens, a native of Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, began her first career as a technical publications manager for Westinghouse Electric. In 1982, she left to start a second career as owner of an IT consulting firm, Word Systems Associates. She spent the next 20 years growing up with the personal computer industry. In 2003, she moved to Lexington and began a third career as a personal historian. Building on skills acquired in careers one and two, she now captures and preserves the stories of individuals, families, and organizations in book form. Through services ranging from ghostwriting and substantive editing to proofreading, Susan creates manuscripts in the unique voices of her clients. She offers general and genealogical research and can coordinate everything from photo selection to indexing. In most cases, she also manages the production process from cover/interior design through layout and printing. However, she is never listed as the author. That honor belongs to the remarkable men and women whose tales she helps to tell.

Not Necessarily Kosher

Not Necessarily Kosher

Harriett Abraham Rose, now in her tenth decade, recounts tales of her life and her American Jewish family as they grappled with the economic, social, and technological changes and challenges of the last century. Her grandfather, Jake Abraham, was a German Jewish immigrant who owned a butcher shop and slaughterhouse in Shelbyville, a small town in central Kentucky. Her grandmother, Theresa Roman Abraham, raised the couple’s twelve children, eight sons who worked in the family business until old enough to pursue their own interests, four daughters who were expected to marry well, prop up their husbands, and embrace the traditions of Southern womanhood. Harriett, who moved to nearby Lexington as a preschooler, graduated from college in time to join the millions of women working to help win World War II. When the war was over, she became a full-time wife and mother but soon realized she needed more than a husband and the traditions of Southern womanhood to lead a fulfilling life. So she returned to school, earned a PhD, and built a successful career in a time and place where such deviation from the norm was considered suspect at worst and odd at best. In telling the stories of the loving, lively, and loquacious Abrahams, the author leads us on a romp through some of the twentieth century’s most turbulent years.